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Today, I am incredibly honored and humbled to be interviewed by Rebelle Society, where I speak about the importance of taking risks, of following one’s inner guidance, and about how my yoga practice radically changed my life. A special thank you to Tanya Lee Markul for making this happen.
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Inspirational tidbits from a positive thinker extraordinaire.

via on Jan 17, 2013

Rebelle Society hearts Jeannie Page and was lucky enough to cuddle up close with her and a smidgen of her day to get inspirational advice about a whole bunch of goodies – taking a leap of faith, what to do in times of crisis, how yoga has been a source of transformation, dealing with heart-break, lessons from the .com world, and what she’ll be focused on in 2013.

Here’s a super-duper inspirational dose of motivational speaker, writer and positive thinker extraordinaire, the lovely Jeannie Page…

You have taken a leap of faith as a result of losing your job. However, there are many people who ‘stay’ where they are as they are afraid to follow their heart, are unsure of the risks, etc. What advice could you give them?

Jeannie: Losing one’s job can certainly come as a shock, and initially as a blow to the ego. However, with the right attitude, being forced out of a job can actually be a huge opportunity…  and in turn a gift. As the old saying goes, it is up to us to “turn lemons into lemonade.” So often we become complacent and stuck in our jobs. We tell ourselves “one day I will leave,” but sadly often times days turns into months, and months turn into years. And for many, unfortunately, that can mean years of unhappiness. For that reason I truly believe that being let go from a job is actually a blessing;

It is a friendly kick from the Universe, a nudge to push us out of what is often a misaligned path and instead towards the direction of our dharma, our true calling.

I think at heart I have always been a risk-taker; I have always seemed to seek out experiences and create changes that will push the edge of my comfort zone and in turn will bring deep learning to my life. At the tender age of 20, I took the risk to move to a foreign country, by myself, to live abroad for a year. I later took the risk to move across country to fight for love, and I’ve taken the risks to move to several new cities, starting over from scratch each time. I’ve dropped out of graduate school, and I’ve quit jobs without having another lined up. Through all of these experiences, I have learned that there truly is no reward without risk. I believe wholeheartedly that the Universe responds with opportunities and experiences that are in direct proportion to our courage.

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As we begin a new year, I pause to reflect back on all that has come before: all of the trials and tribulations, the beautiful and painful moments, all of the invaluable lessons learned. And I realize how far I have come, how much every experience, every moment has contributed to a beautiful transformation that has made me the strong, vibrant, and happy woman that I am today. And I am grateful.

After living through the darkest years of my life, I came to fully understand the valuable piece of knowledge that through our thoughts and our feelings, we create much of our own reality. Armed with that knowledge, I made a conscious choice to turn my life around, and in turn throughout 2011 and 2012, I have experienced and LIVED the happiest, most joy-filled, abundant, expansive years of my life. Now that I have integrated very conscious practices into my everyday life, as a way of life, rather than something fleeting, I know that I hold the power to make 2013 and beyond equally as potent, magical, and blissful.

Here’s to a lifetime of continued abundance and happiness. ♥

Photo by Flickr user Chema Escarcega.

Photo by Flickr user Chema Escarcega.


Photo by Flickr User KateWares.

Yesterday I was inspired to post the following expression of gratitude on my Facebook wall:

I am so grateful for my life: for every triumph,
for every crushing defeat, for every choice,
for every risk,
for every life-altering decision,
for every raw, devastating heartbreak,
for every betrayal, for every lesson learned.

I am grateful for every moment,
for each one has made me who I am today,
living this incredible life, so full of gratitude.

As we have just celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday here in the United States, we were all reminded to pause and give thanks for the blessings in our lives. But as someone who has come to understand, firsthand, the sheer power of gratitude, I have learned that the practice of gratitude is really meant to be a daily one, not one that we simply do just one day a year.

A few years back I found myself at the darkest depths of my soul, living through the most painful, most challenging years of my life. I was at rock bottom and I had become merely a shell of the vibrant person that I had once been. Through a stroke of Grace, a new friend stepped into my life and introduced me to the Law of Attraction, to the idea that our thoughts do have power and that with those thoughts we can attract both positive and negative into our lives; and that whether we realize it or not, we are doing so unconsciously, on a daily basis.

As the clouds above my head were growing ever darker and more ominous, I decided that I would try anything to turn my life around. So in order to shift my thoughts to the positive, I began a daily practice of gratitude. Every single day I would write down a list of all of the positive things that had happened in that day, and all of the things for which I was grateful, however small. It didn’t matter how miserable I felt or how little I wanted to drag myself out of bed, I forced myself to write the list.

Photo by Flickr user wocado.

I did this every day for months on end, and as I did so, I was shocked by what began to happen. Little by little,  unexpected, positive things would appear in my life: the right people would show up, happy synchronicities would occur out of the blue, and slowly but surely the circumstances in my life began to change. The negative began to be replaced by the positive until after a few years of continued gratitude practice (complemented by a consistent yoga practice), I found myself living the most fully and vibrantly that I had ever lived in my life. This is where I sit now. I have become whole, I have fully embodied my spirit, and my inner light glows more purely and brightly than ever. I largely credit this to the practice of gratitude.

Unfortunately, it is a sad reality of the human condition that all to often we find ourselves feeling like victims: we blame others for the pain and betrayals inflicted upon us, we feel sorry for ourselves for the bad things that have happened to us, we find ourselves asking, “Why me?!” We say to ourselves, “If only “X,Y or Z” would happen, I could finally be happy.”

The problem is that every time we embody one of those feelings, we are giving away our own power. When we hold someone or some force outside of ourselves responsible for our happiness, we are giving that force power over us and we are ignoring the reality that we have the power to co-create happiness in our lives. The power resides in our thoughts and our feelings.

Photo by Flickr User exper.

If we look back on our lives with anger, bitterness and regret, we are sending negative energy out into the Universe, and that is exactly what we will attract back: more negativity. And then we head into a downward spiral. So instead of begrudging our past, we must look back and embrace every aspect of our journey: the good, the bad, and the ugly. We must look for the lesson in every experience, and if we look really hard, we may even find a silver lining, something beautiful that came out of a dark experience.

We must embrace the light and the shadow sides of life. We must be thankful for our challenging and painful experiences, for teaching us invaluable lessons, for giving us strength, and for delivering us to new places where we were meant to travel. We must look back and delight in how the dots connected, realizing that so much of it was for a reason.

So, yes, when I look back at my own life, I am grateful for every triumph for giving me courage and showing me that of which I was capable.

I am grateful for every crushing defeat for giving me the motivation and the fire in my belly to get back into the ring and keep on fighting.

I am grateful for every choice, no matter where it led, for each choice has taught me that there are no mistakes, just detours; and that often those detours proved to be for a beautiful and important reason.

I am grateful for having the bravery to take risks, to walk boldly in the face of fear, and to forge my own path, regardless of society’s “rules.” It is these risks that have allowed my life to expand beyond all wonder.

I am grateful for every life-altering decision I have had the courage to make, for these decisions have afforded me rich, breathtaking, and priceless experiences, and have allowed beautiful souls, from all over the world, to cross my path.

I am grateful for every raw, devastating heartbreak: I am grateful for the first for revealing to me my profound capacity for love. I am grateful for the second for allowing me to feel true soul connection and subsequently for breaking me, because it was that experience that set me free for future love and growth. And I am most grateful to the third for showing me the highest vibration of light and love I have ever known, and for shattering that which was already broken… for it was this experience that led me into the powerful fires of transformation.

I am grateful for every betrayal, for each one made me a stronger, more resilient person, and allowed me to better understand my own values and inner truth.

Photo by Flickr user Manue@PrettyKiku.

And lastly, I am grateful for every lesson learned, no matter how excruciating, no matter how much the wind was knocked out of me, for each lesson has allowed my soul to evolve into the conscious and awakened being that I am today. I am grateful for every single moment, from the breathtaking, life-altering ones, to the seemingly unimportant ones, for I understand that every moment is a precious step along the soul’s journey.

For all that has come before, for all that is now, and for all that will come, however unknown, I am and will always be grateful.

 ♥


Today I am honored and humbled to be featured on “Transformation Talk,” a new blog series where each Thursday Alana Sheeren will interview people who have deepened their passion or found their calling after experiencing a loss, trauma or diagnosis. I am truly honored to be a part of this project.

To all of you out there who are suffering from grief and loss, I hope that you will tune in each Thursday to Alana’s blog. She has many incredible and inspiring stories to share, the least of which is her own. ♥

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Can you share a little about your grief journey and a specific experience that had a profound effect on your path?

In 2007 I lost the best friend I had ever had in my life, a man who had been my rock and with whom I shared every aspect of my heart and soul, for almost four years. He did not die or anything that dramatic, but after he met a new woman, he chose to cut me completely from his life. As he truly was my best friend, and I was certain that this was a soul-connected being, for me this felt worse than death. I gave up a great job and a well-established life and moved 3,000 miles across the country to fight for him. But sadly I was met with only more anger and hatred from him.  He tossed me to the curb like a piece of garbage. That was 5 years ago, he has since married that woman, and I’ve never heard from him since.

Though I had lost other best friends and had lived through devastating broken hearts in the past, nothing in my life could ever have prepared me for the grief that I felt when this man walked right out of my life and acted as if I’d never mattered at all to him. The person I had most trusted on this Earth, betrayed that trust, broke all of his promises to me, and abandoned me. Everything I had ever known and believed came crashing down around me. I had entered my “dark night of the soul.”

To continue reading the interview, click here.


I love how kids will say whatever is on their mind, ever so innocently…

Last month I had the pleasure of visiting my brother and my 6-year-old twin nieces. At 6 years old, they are always a bundle of vibrant energy, fun… and unexpected surprises. One day, while helping the girls with their morning routine, one of the girls looked at me and said, “Aunt Jeannie, how come you don’t have a baby?”

In an instant my mind raced with all of the possible responses, searching for the most appropriate one for their innocent ears. I replied, “Well, because I haven’t yet met the right man to marry.” I can’t quite remember exactly how the conversation ensued from there, but I believe their next question was something to the effect of why I didn’t have a boyfriend. In this moment frozen in time, I was immediately reminded of so many of their kids’ movies, where the princess has to be saved by the prince, where finding her true love is always the objective, where getting married and riding off into the sunset is always the outcome; and I realized how many societal messages we are bombarded with from the time we are small children. And it occurred to me that I was being granted a very powerful teaching moment.

I then went on to explain to the girls that I didn’t have a boyfriend, and that it is ok to not have a boyfriend, that it is ok to be single. I think this was the first time that they came to understand the word “single.” I explained to them that I choose to be single because I hadn’t yet met the right man to date, and that I will very happily remain single until I do find the right match. And then they so nicely informed me, “But Aunt Jeannie, you are the only one who doesn’t have a boyfriend.” Oh bless their little innocent hearts.

I then proceeded to list for them all of daddy’s friends who are “single,” the “aunts” and “uncles” who fill their lives on a regular basis, people about whom it never occurred to them to wonder their relationship status, or what that even means. After finishing the laundry list of singletons that surround their lives, I then said what I think was the most important lesson I could teach them, “We don’t have to get married. We can choose to get married or we can choose to be single. We can be anything we want in this life. But the most important thing is to be happy. I am single and I am very happy.”

As the day went on, I reflected on what a powerful moment this was for me with my nieces, and what an opportunity I have to be a positive influence in their lives: a role model to show them that they can do and be anything that they want in this life, that they do not have to settle for anything less than what they deserve, and that they do not have to follow the societal blue-print. I hope to teach them, by example, that they can forge their own paths, that they can take their own risks, that they can be bold, strong and brave, and that they can find their own life’s purpose on this Earth.

Photo by Flickr user reemer.

I then began to think about all of the people I see around me who are in unhappy relationships: people who are stuck in the societal mold and are scared to break out of it, people who are terrified to be alone. And I thought about the happy couples who are few and far between: those couples that you just look at and say “Yes! Those two are so in love!,” the couples who just exude peace and happiness, and who truly complement one another like yin and yang. And I was reminded once again that one should never settle for less than that and of how much better it is to be happily single than to be unhappily married or in a relationship with the wrong person.

I thought about all of my “happily single” friends, the empowered and independent men and women who have had so many adventures and who have done so many incredible things with their careers and their lives. And I hoped for my nieces that they would never end up in the situation of an unhappy relationship, that they would be brave enough to be alone and strong enough to wait for the right man, or if they preferred, that they would choose to be “happily single.”

Later on in the week, out of the blue, one of my nieces stood up proudly and declared, “When I grow up, I want to be single!” I smiled from ear to ear as I chucked to myself. I knew that I had planted a good seed: a seed of an independent, empowered woman who doesn’t have to be anything that society dictates; a seed of an innocent girl who will grow up to be a strong and beautiful woman who can choose to lead any kind of life that she wants.

Photo by Flickr user Chema Escarcega.

Celebrate Life


Photo by Flickr user qviri.

You never know what you are going to find around the next corner…

Tonight I changed my routine a bit. Because my regular yoga teacher is out of town, I decided to check out a new yoga class, which on this Friday night put me in a different neighborhood, at a different time than my usual routine.

I walked through San Francisco’s beautiful Panhandle Park, happily listening to my Pandora. Enjoying the shadows of the late afternoon sun, I watched joggers and bikers breeze by, men playing basketball on the nearby court, and dog-lovers throwing tennis balls to their “Fido.” It was a lovely, typical Friday evening in San Francisco.

I turned the corner onto Stanyan Street to head towards the yoga studio, and as I approached the Whole Foods Market, suddenly I heard loud sirens and saw several police cars and motorcycles descend upon the market. I stopped to see what was going on. From where I stood I could see two men on the ground, one flailing around and yelling, the other silent and motionless. I chatted with other onlookers, all of us trying to piece together what had happened. Apparently someone had been caught shop-lifting (the young guy who was pinned down and yelling) and there was some kind of pursuit by the security guard, which somehow rendered the security guard lying lifeless on the pavement.

Photo by Flickr user Scott Beale.

Next, a fire truck roared up, and one of the police officers ran over to the fire department medic that jumped out of the truck. Listening intently to what the officers said, I overheard the police officer say (I believe about the security guard), “He’s turning blue.”

It occurred to me that his airway was obstructed and that he was likely in shock or had perhaps suffered a heart attack. The medic ran over to the security guard on the ground, and then I and my fellow onlookers watched in sobering awe as the medic began CPR on the man. We could see his chest move up and down as the medic performed repeated chest compressions. This went on for several minutes.

In a split second, I reflected on my previous training class with the San Francisco Fire Department for Emergency Rescue training, and on the CPR certification that I had received. As I thought of all of those trial runs I had performed on the dummy, my mind raced to remember the correct CPR ratio: 2 breaths to every 30 chest compressions. It was one thing to be performing CPR on a practice dummy in the safety of a class, but here I was witnessing the real deal, and I thought to myself, “If I had to do it for real, would I be able? Would I remember what I needed to do?” I was struck by the reality that this man’s fragile human life lay in the hands of another human being, a complete stranger. If ever there was a sobering moment, this was it.

Photo by Flickr user onns.

I couldn’t help but think about the absolute fragility of life; of how delicate our organic bodies are, and of how many possible threats and dangers exist in every day life. At any moment, any one of us could get hit by a bus, have a dangerous fall down the stairs, suffer from an unexpected stroke or heart attack, or even (when you live in a major city like San Francisco) be hit by a stray bullet. And in that moment it occurred to me how frivolous and irrelevant are so many of our trivial human worries: how pointless it is for us to worry about that guy or girl who rejected us; to be upset about the bad haircut; to be stressed about our jerk boss or the promotion we didn’t get.

In the grand scheme of things, and of our place in the Universe, these daily trials and tribulations are so unimportant and are not worth wasting our energy over. Instead we should be focusing on living in the present moment, on the positivity and beauty that exists in our lives and around us at any given moment. We should take the time to tell our friends and family how much we love them. Instead of worrying and stressing, we should be living… and we should be loving.

I was jerked out of my deep thoughts as I saw the medic pull out the paddles with which to shock the man. I knew from my own CPR course that the amount of time he had spent doing chest compressions was a worrying sign. I held my breath as I watched him apply the paddles and shock the man. I was all too aware of the gravity of the situation I just happened to be observing.

To the relief of all those of us who watched, suddenly we saw them putting an IV drip into the man’s arm. I then overheard one of the officers saying that the man had a pulse. I let out a sigh of relief and then watched in awe and admiration as they lifted the man onto a stretcher and loaded him into the back of the ambulance. I had just witnessed this man’s life being saved, right before my eyes…just on a random Friday night, on my random walk to yoga.

With great respect and appreciation, I thought about all of our brave first responders who save so many lives, every day. After the recent anniversary of September 11th, followed by a sad week of watching four of our American citizens tragically lose their lives in Libya, and now after witnessing this incredible scene of this fireman saving the life of a complete stranger, I was reminded that there are heroes all around us and among us. And whether they are saving lives, or sacrificing their lives, they are a very important reminder that life is to be celebrated.

So the next time you are out and about, whether on your usual routine, or perhaps mixing up your routine as I did mine, open your eyes. Look around you. Look at all of the beauty and life that is teeming around you, at every moment, or perhaps just around the next corner. Remember that life is a gift, that it is precious…and remember that life should be celebrated, always.

Photo by Flickr user Princess K8.

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Photo attributed to Flickr User flydown.

For years I could not visit Boston. The pain was too great, the ghosts too many. Haunted by the memories of failed relationships, of devastating broken hearts, and of shattered dreams, the thought of returning to the scene of the crime simply filled me with too much dread. I had moved forward to new cities, new adventures with new lives and new friends, where I was living new memories and trying to forget the tragedy of fore. I was attempting, determinedly and desperately, to birth a new Jeannie.

But over time, the pull of family obligations and unexpected job opportunities would find me back in Boston, walking reluctantly through my old closets, trying to dodge the skeletons. Try as I might to avoid my old haunts, the pull of unresolved emotion would sometimes be too great to resist. I would find myself walking in a fog of mental haze through old neighborhoods, past old apartments, and stepping right through time portals that would carry me straight back to the scene of so many memories, so many palpable emotions. I tasted them, more bitter than sweet. I smelled them, more sour than succulent. Though they were done and dead, I relived them, painfully and tragically, over and over.

I couldn’t go to that restaurant, for that was where I met “him.” That patch of grass was where we lay looking for shooting stars. That video store was where I mustered up the guts to talk to “him.” That park was where we broke up. That subway was what we would ride, holding hands. That store was where we walked by the sweet kitty in the window. That bar was where we shared our first kiss. And that stoop was where I said good-bye, wiping the tears from “his” eyes. It seemed everywhere I looked there were reminders of love lost, of best friends tragically ripped from my life.

Photo attributed to Flickr User Helmut Kaczmarek.

But the years went by and as it always does, time began to heal all wounds, little by little. One city, then another city, and then a third city, and I had created three new versions of Jeannie, each a little different than the first. I was slowly becoming a different person. I was meeting new people, having new experiences, creating new memories, making new friends, living entirely different lives. Eventually, I was no longer that same Jeannie who had lain on that patch of grass or stood on that stoop. Though that person would always be a part of me, she had transformed and blossomed into a new creature, a stronger and more resilient being, shaped by the landscape of life.

This year, family would find me returning to Boston, now a hard-to-imagine 9 years since I’d left. And I unexpectedly found myself excited to return. I was excited to visit with family, to smell the salty sea air, to walk around the quaint cobblestone streets with their charming colonial houses. I looked forward to creating new memories.

Boston Public Garden

Once there, my family and I set right out to experience all that the beautiful city of Boston has to offer: walks through the Boston Public Garden, under my favorite weeping willow trees; strolling past the old row-houses of Back Bay; romping through the historic streets of Beacon Hill with their adorable gas lanterns; walking along the waterfront taking in the sweet smell of salty air as we watched the boats come and go. I felt no need to re-visit my old haunts, I somehow knew that those graves did not need to be walked on.

But as we strolled about, all over the city, we inevitably happened upon several of the spots of my past trials. Not sure how I would feel, I was somewhat surprised and delighted to find myself smiling. Those memories that had once been painful, were no longer. What had once filled my heart with deep, debilitating pain, now instead filled my heart with peace and love. I thought about the memories, and the people behind them, and to my shock I found myself filled with nothing but fondness for them. I realized in that instant that the old Jeannie had integrated with the new Jeannie.

I remember the feeling that I had that first day that I landed in Boston. As the old Jeannie collided with the new Jeannie, I felt a sense of strangeness; how surreal it was to have to consider and attempt to reconcile these two completely different people. They were so different: one was young, innocent, and vulnerable; while the other was mature, graceful and wise. They knew such different experiences, such distinct lives.

But now as I sit on the airplane heading back to San Francisco, the city of my current life, I realize that I am happily and peacefully integrated. The new Jeannie met the old Jeannie, thanked her for all of the powerful lessons learned, recognizing that she could not exist without her former self. And the old Jeannie smiled proudly at the new Jeannie, patted her on the back for a job well done and sent her off on her way, into the new adventures and lessons that would await…and transform her once again.

Photo attributed to Flickr User h.koppdelaney.

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